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Rhum Agricole

Fresh sugar cane juice rhum from the French islands.


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Old 07-04-2007, 03:40 PM   #21
Hank Koestner
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Rhums produced in Martinique and Guadaloupe are among my most favorite. As Ed says, there are differences in flavor depending on how the final product was made. May I suggest anything from the Neisson family as one you may like, also DePaz.........It is also fun and informative to find out which process each distillery uses and compare them. This is something I have started to look into. Taste them as you like, and enjoy!!
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Old 07-05-2007, 07:19 AM   #22
Mr Fjeld
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Thanks for the response guys, I'll certainly look for more ruhm agricole when traveling this summer
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Old 07-05-2007, 06:59 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Hamilton View Post
Part of the taste difference is due to the different yeasts used for fermentation.
One distiller with whom I spoke complained about the inevitablity of wild strains of yeast when working with fresh cane juice and some of the "off" flavors that they introduce.
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Old 07-05-2007, 10:21 PM   #24
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Wild stains of yeast are only one of the variables with which distillers have to contend when dealing with fresh sugar cane juice. But it should be noted that most wild strains of yeast take longer to cause fermentation than the cultivated yeast most distillers use in their distilleries.

If you aren't growing your own cane, or your distillery isn't next to a sugar cane field it is impossible to use fresh sugar cane juice as a raw ingredient.
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Old 11-12-2007, 12:24 PM   #25
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Default yeast flavor contribution

We have been experimenting with different yeast strains to ferment the molasses at the distillery. It is truly amazing the different flavors that the yeast contribute. Our first experiment was with a yeast that was isolated off of Guatamalan sugar cane and the resultant rum tasted very close to a rhum agricole, very grassy and slightly phenolic. I had always assumed the grassy character came from the freshly pressed cane but I am convinced that most of that flavor comes from the yeast.
The batch we fermented with Belgian ale yeast was very tasty and we are now fermenting a batch with German Hefe weizen yeast, hoping that some of the banana/clove character will come through in the distillation.

cheers! -Mike "Elvis" Karnowski
head distiller
New Orleans Rum
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Old 12-19-2007, 12:03 PM   #26
KINGSTON
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I just started learing about this "Rhum". I have yet to get my hands on a bottle. I just picked up the magazine ISLANDS. In their December issue they have an article intitled, Vive la Rhum- The Distinctive Flavor of Martinique's Rum Industry. It's short but sweet, if you find your self in a book store this month check it out.

Kingston
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Old 05-21-2008, 06:58 PM   #27
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Default Rhum Agricole History

Hiya,

Looking for information about Rhum Agricole history.

My short summary of what I've been trying to parse:

Rum has been produced in Martinique since some time in the 1600s. However most of the cane went into sugar production.

Some time in the 19th Century there was a collapse of the sugar market, forcing cane growers to consider alternative ways to use their crop, including distilling more for rum.

In 1902 there was a volcano eruption on Martinique, destroying many of the cane fields.

However, when World War I rolled around, increased interest in alcohol for industrial and war use, restarted distilling cane into alcohol in Martinique.

After World War I, these new production facilities were switched to producing alcohol for human consumption.

Questions:

Is this summary accurate?

Was rum in Martinique made from cane juice before the collapse of the sugar market or was it entirely "industrial rum" from molasses?

Which companies first marketed Rhum Agricole?

Thanks!

~Erik
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Old 05-21-2008, 07:28 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ejellest View Post
Hiya,

Looking for information about Rhum Agricole history.

My short summary of what I've been trying to parse:

Rum has been produced in Martinique since some time in the 1600s. However most of the cane went into sugar production.

Some time in the 19th Century there was a collapse of the sugar market, forcing cane growers to consider alternative ways to use their crop, including distilling more for rum.
That happened in the 1880s. The decline in the sugar industry was a direct result of a world wide recession and competition from sugar produced from sugar beets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ejellest View Post
In 1902 there was a volcano eruption on Martinique, destroying many of the cane fields.
The Mont Pelйe eruption didn't destroy too much of the sugar cane fields but it did destroy the St James distillery. There was already a lot of sugar cane growing in other parts of the island.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ejellest View Post
However, when World War I rolled around, increased interest in alcohol for industrial and war use, restarted distilling cane into alcohol in Martinique.

After World War I, these new production facilities were switched to producing alcohol for human consumption.

Questions:

Is this summary accurate?

Was rum in Martinique made from cane juice before the collapse of the sugar market or was it entirely "industrial rum" from molasses?

Which companies first marketed Rhum Agricole?

Thanks!

~Erik
The question of who marketed the first rhum agricole is one of debate. St James, Clement and others make that claim.
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Old 05-21-2008, 07:52 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Hamilton View Post
[...]
The question of who marketed the first rhum agricole is one of debate. St James, Clement and others make that claim.
Do any of them have a ballpark year for the claims? What's the earliest bottle anyone has ever turned up?
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Old 07-28-2010, 01:12 AM   #30
vincana
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Default Cachaca?

Ok maybe a dumb question, but Agricole production sounds similar to cachaca. Aside from regional requirements whats the difference??
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