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White Rums

Whether you call them, clear, silver, white or simple 'see through' how do you drink them?


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Old 05-14-2007, 07:04 PM   #1
Troy
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Default Sugar cane juice/syrup

Any favorites for making your favorite rum drinks?

I just ordered some made in Martinique. I look forward to trying it out.
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Old 05-15-2007, 04:51 AM   #2
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That`s one thing makes me wonder. The shops in Germany they offer hundreds of Rum, but only one Cane Syrup. What are the differences? At the moment I use La Mauny Syrup.
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Old 06-16-2007, 11:06 PM   #3
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Here's an introduction to sugar production, which I hope sheds some light on sugar and sugar cane syrup. In the US, there are a lot of bar syrups which are made from high fructose corn syrup.



Sugar (sucrose) is a natural carbohydrate, found in all fruits and vegetables. All green plants manufacture sugar, in various forms including sucrose and glucose, through photosynthesis, but sugar cane and sugar beet plants contain the most accessible stores of sucrose, the sugar we ferment to make alcohol. Distilled alcohol made from sugar cane is called rum while alcohol made from less accessible sources of sucrose such as grapes is known as wine or distilled to make brandy and cognac.

Almost every rum distiller will tell you about the quality of the sugar cane used to make their rum. In reality, most rum is made from imported molasses, the byproduct of the sugar making process. In order to appreciate the differences in rum, it’s helpful to understand how sugar and molasses are made.

After growing nine to twelve months in the tropical regions of the world and reaching a height of 10 to 20 feet, the mature hard, sweet grass stalks are harvested by machine or hand depending on the cost of labor and contain 12-14% sucrose.

First, the sugar cane stalks are washed then chopped into shreds by a series of rotating knives. Next, huge rollers press the juice out of the shredded pulp. In the production of rhum agricole, it is this freshly-squeezed sugar cane juice that is fermented and then distilled.

At distilleries that make rum from molasses, the molasses is purchased from either a local sugar mill or from a foreign supplier. In order to make sugar and molasses the cane is harvested and crushed in the same manner as above, though on a larger scale. Lime is added to the fresh juice then carbon dioxide is bubbled through the mixture to form calcium carbonate which is precipitated and then removed.

The clarified juice is concentrated by removing the water in vacuum pans which boil the juice at lower temperatures and protect the sugar from carmelization as the juice becomes a rich brown syrup.

As the last portion of water is removed under a carefully controlled vacuum seed grain (pulverized sugar) is fed into the vacuum pan and thick dark crystals grow and are then separated in centrifuges, large perforated baskets that yield golden raw sugar.

Raw sugar is approximately 96-98% sucrose and covered by a thin film of molasses, a dark thick syrup containing sugar, water, plant material, minerals, and other non-sugars. The composition of this molasses is dependent on the efficiency of the sugar manufacturing equipment, and the source of the fresh sugar cane.

To remove the molasses layer on the raw sugar, the sugar is dissolved and then separation is accomplished in centrifuges and carbon filtering to yield a water-white sugar syrup and thick dark molasses. From the water-white sugar syrup sugar crystals are formed in vacuum pans, centrifuged and dried before being separated according to size. Since the pure sugar crystals are naturally colorless, no bleaching or whitening is necessary.

Turbinado sugaris sugar that has been refined to a light tan color by washing in a centrifuge under sanitary conditions to remove the surface molasses but it has not been purified by carbon filtering.
Confectioners (powdered) sugar is made up of much finer particles than granulated sugar and contains about 3% corn starch (to prevent caking).
Brown sugaris sugar crystals in a specially prepared molasses syrup with controlled natural flavor and color components.
Petite Canne Sugar Cane Syrup is made by dissolving raw Martinique sugar cane sugar in hot water to make a saturated syrup retaining the flavor of the raw sugar. Every other sugar cane syrup available in the US is made from molasses or more refined sugar and has either a strong molasses flavor or lacks the flavor of raw sugar cane.
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Old 06-17-2007, 08:53 AM   #4
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Post Petite Canne Syrup

I was able to find this syrup online at internetwineandspirits.com. Since I am a big fan of the "Ti Punch", I use this syrup often. It has it's own flavor, but I dont think it it usually substituted for simple syrup in rum drinks because it may have an effect on the cocktail. I used it in a Mojito, and the flavor is slightly different than simple syrup. ( I liked it better). Of course with trial and error, some people might prefer it. Based on what Ed said, I imagine Le Mauny must be similar to Petite Canne.
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Old 06-17-2007, 11:18 AM   #5
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La Mauny, Trois Rivieres, St James and Clement all market syrups which are similar to the Petite Canne you found at internetwines.com. Depaz is also importing a syrup to the US which is much darker and has more of a molasses flavor.

One of the secrets of using real sugar cane syrup from Martinique is that you don't need, nor should you, use more than a little of this sweet, flavorful syrup.
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Old 06-17-2007, 08:05 PM   #6
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I have taken your advice on that, ED. I use a 1/4 teaspoon in a Ti Punch. I used much less in the Mojito than the recipe called for symple syrup.
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Old 06-17-2007, 10:35 PM   #7
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Occasionally I have a mojito made with Neisson Rhum Agricole Blanc and sugar cane syrup from Martinique. The syrup dissolves much faster than sugar and adds a nice flavor, but at 100 proof, you have to be careful not to add too much rum.
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Old 11-21-2007, 07:44 PM   #8
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One thing I appreciate about this forum is the potential for new discoveries. I missed this topic originally, but was appreciative of the concise, succinct description of sugar(s) made from sugar cane.

I am also interested in trying one of the Martinique sugar cane syrups. I now have a reason to purchase sugar syrup rather than making my own. I will be interested to see how the two compare.
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Old 11-21-2007, 11:55 PM   #9
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As far as I'm aware, sugar cane syrup is made from sugar cane juice which is heated or boiled to remove some of the water. Simple syrup, on the other hand, is simply a solution of white (refined) sugar in water. Therefore, simple syrup can be made very easily at home, whereas cane syrup can only be made in a sugar factory.

I've tried making simple syrup from unrefined (golden caster) sugar, and the resulting syrup has a much richer flavour than syrup made from white sugar. However, cane syrup has an altogether different flavour which it is impossible to reproduce in a domestic kitchen.
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Old 12-01-2007, 11:53 PM   #10
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I have not yet been able to find any of those cane syrups from the Caribbean which I would really like to try, but maybe there are some site on internet which ships to Sweden..
The only syrup I have found here so far is Monin and its ok.
But I usually make my syrup with a dark brown sugar and a medium brown sugar imported from England that is available here, together with some Tahitian vanilla and it makes a nice syrup.
But I would like to try Petit canne and La Mauny.
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