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What do you think, confidentially of course?


View Poll Results: How important is the environmental consciousness of the distiller?
Environmental consciousness is important but only affects 10% of my decision to buy. 21 47.73%
Environmental consciousness is important but only affects 20% of my decision to buy. 4 9.09%
Environmental consciousness is important but only affects 30% of my decision to buy. 3 6.82%
Environmental consciousness is important and affects 40% of my decision to buy. 1 2.27%
Environmental consciousness is important and affects 50% of my decision to buy. 6 13.64%
Environmental consciousness is important and affects 60% of my decision to buy. 4 9.09%
Environmental consciousness is important and affects 70% of my decision to buy. 3 6.82%
Environmental consciousness is very important and affects 80% of my decision to buy. 2 4.55%
90% of my decision to buy is based on the environmental consciousness of the distiller. 0 0%
100% of my decision to buy is based on the environmental consciousness of the distiller. 0 0%
Voters: 44. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-19-2007, 08:51 PM   #11
angelsword
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottes View Post
And I came across a blurb stating that the Maui sugar-cane industry used to burn the bagasse and produced electricity for themselves but also for the entire island of Maui. Even now, one of the Maui sugar producers produces 18 megawatts from it's bagasse, uses 12 and sends 6 megawatts back into Maui's grid.
The same kind of thing is being done in Texas by the Rio Grande Valley Sugar Growers. The sell the excess electricity back to the grid. We are looking at building a distillery next door to them.
http://news.tradingcharts.com/futures/0/4/99093040.html

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Old 10-20-2007, 01:33 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Milicent View Post
Apparently, the Haitian immigrants who do the majority of the work live in abysmal conditions that many have likened to slavery.
I recently heard that the average income in Haiti is about $217 a year. A quick google shows a range from "under $200" to "$280" annually.
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Old 10-26-2007, 01:53 PM   #13
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I recently had the opportunity to talk to three distillery representatives who explained what their companies were doing to process their effluent. One distillery in the Caribbean sprays their spent yeast on the fields as a fertilizer. The second uses a sophisticated system of spent yeast recovery and recycles the waste and the third is handing the waste to their municipality since it is really their problem to meet the environmental regulations and it would cost a lot of money to handle the waste differently based on the cost of energy on that island. Three very different approaches to a common problem. Of course there are a lot of other factors that have to be factored in to this discussion. The distiller that spreads the waste on the fields has an interest in the sugar cane crop and the others import molasses. One distillery is in an urban setting and has been operating for about a hundred years and the third was built in the last ten years with an eye to the future.

Besides dealing with the spent yeast the fermentation process also produces CO2 gas which can be recovered, filtered and used to carbonate other beverages. The wine industry in California is wrestling with CO2 emissions and some distillers are seeing this as an opportunity to be better wardens of the environment.
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Old 11-25-2007, 04:22 PM   #14
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Haleakala Distillers on Maui has been using bio-diesel in their delivery vehicle for years. At a time when a lot of people can't be bothered to investigate, much less implement, anything to reduce their impact on the environment, Haleakala should be applauded for their responsible actions.
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Old 02-08-2008, 03:54 PM   #15
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Very enlightening read, but I'm afraid I only went with the first alternative too. I'm consider myself extremely lucky because I'm relatively new to rum and have so much to look forward to. However, since there is so much to discover I feel I cannot let environmental considerations inform my choices too much. Instead, it makes sense to explore tastes, scents, types etc. without any regard about how it was made; the amount of energy used,waste etc.

But I welcome any information about environmentally friendly policies of the producers. I understand some of the warmer climate are more at risk than the northern hemisphere and if given the choice I think the consumers like ourselves would happily buy the slightly costlier product if it was produced in an environmentally friendly way - especially so because many of the products we buy are in a more expensive price segment so I suppose we are prepared to pay more than the average supermarket consumers. I don't think the supermarket chains see it that way as they are always trying their best to haggle the prices.
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Old 03-03-2008, 03:33 AM   #16
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Ed,

I think one choice was missing the selection for a complete & fair poll result.

0%
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Old 03-12-2008, 01:24 AM   #17
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We're coming into an ever-increasing age of hearing about eco-friendly producers of... everything.

Yes, I think it is important. Very important, but I also consider a lot of it is pure marketing and marketing gain. Take the high-end eco-friendly grocery chains. They tout buying wind energy credits, sell organic, etc.

I read an interesting article a few months ago (I wish I could properly leave credit for it), where it made an excellent point. These stores really play up supporting local growers of organic products, they "showcase" this all over the store, but upon close inspection, the shelf space given to local producers is a tiny tiny fraction. Why? It's probably cheaper to bring organic apples up from Chile (or whatever the product is). The problem however, it how much fuel in consumed, and pollution created in the transport of those Chilean apples???

I find a lot of organic products to be excessively expensive and I believe that they are playing on the heartstrings of people who want to "go green" and also fears about hormones added to milk (a lot of which is not even true), and are willing to do it at even a much higher cost.

Do I think the rum industry should be "green"? I think all manufacturers that create any waste products or consume energy (which is, gee, well, about all of them), need to do what they can to be more eco-friendly.

However, I'm not buying any rum/rhum based on how eco-friendly the producer is. (I'm bearing in mind that those who market their products as being "organic" are often going to great lengths of exagerating the truth). Now, if someone sold me a really good story on how they produce eco-friendly, and make a rum I really liked at a reasonable price, you can bet I'd buy it.

Interesting story though -for those of you who like vodka - check out Vermont Gold Vodka. These guys are EXTREME!!!

Last edited by primate77; 03-12-2008 at 01:28 AM.
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:08 PM   #18
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I concur that there is a lot of "green-wash" in the marketplace, and that you have to be very careful.

One surprising example from my industry (Architecture) is the U.S. Green Building Council, developers of the LEED ratings systems for buildings. Sounds good, right? Until you find out one of their major corporate funders is the Vinyl Institute. :eek:
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Old 03-13-2008, 01:11 PM   #19
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I love it when you see things like Celebrities who advocate a day of going without your car for the entire day, and what kind of environmental impact that would make if everyone just did not drive their car on that one day.

(And then the very next day, John Travolta gets aboard and pilots one of his five private jets)!

Unfortunately, "organic" has become a mega-marketing monster that has filtered it's way down to the ranks of alcohol spirits.

Some of it's viable, some of it I'm sure is subtleties and "partial truth" and a lot of story-stretching to get you on board.

I suppose if I went to the actual distillery, talked to the people there, learned as much about the product as I could, and the product actually tasted good - yeah, I'd probably become a very loyal buyer/consumer.

I find myself repeatedly buying the same brand of chocolate because I visited the factory and liked what I saw (and tasted), I like a specific micro brewed beer because I went to the factory and liked what I saw (and tasted).

I'm sure it'd be no different for me with a good rum. Now, just gotta find a way to get to the Caribbean! I'm envious of you who are already there, or live in Florida and it's like driving across the border into Wisconsin for me (but much more enjoyable)!
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Old 03-19-2008, 11:03 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottes View Post
I had to pick 10%, because I really go for the rum. I have to say that I am *much* happier when I find out that a distillery does good things like this, but the rum influences my decision. If I find out that a distillery does good things then I might change my mind if I originally felt that the price was too high, but that's rare, too.

Though I certainly do care, it doesn't influence my purchase decision - the rum does.
0 %
Hey we're all gonna die anyway, so enjoy the rum.....Scottes right. It's all about the rum. But if the Distillery is making a conscious decision for a greener way to produce rum, then I'm all for it...But if they're not and the rums GOOD......, Well wild horses pulling a plough, to save on fossil fuel being omitted into the ozone layer, couldn't stop me from sipping and savouring the rum. So as long as most of the rum companies keep re using bourbon, whisky and cognac barrel, (Saving Trees...Take note Bourbons), Keep on collecting CO2 from their fermentation tanks, (Slow down global warming) and keep using their waste as fertiliser, then I'm happy.
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